Tools for Social Work

Using Standardization and the Normal Curve to Enhance your Social Work Practice, Education & Research

Posts Tagged ‘Social Work’

Use of Standardized Measures in Agency Based Research and Practice

Posted by nepeht on May 5, 2009

Article:

  Berkman B., & Maramaldi P. (2001). Use of standardized measures in agency based research and practice.  Social Work in Health Care, 34(1-2), 115-29. Retrieved on May 5, 2009 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12219762 .

Quoting the PubMed.com source:

“This article reviews criteria for social workers’ selection and use of standardized outcome measures for practice and research. Issues related to reliability and validity are discussed. The utility of standardized Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) measures, either generic or disease specific, is presented utilizing one measure, the SF-36+ Social Work, as an exemplar. The article concludes that such measures are viable and necessary for social work to demonstrate its value-added qualities in the emerging healthcare environment.”

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Article: “The Bell Curve: Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Social Work”

Posted by nepeht on December 28, 2008

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6467/is_/ai_n28743565

This is and it IS NOT exactly what this blog is about. 

However, if one can understand the basic issues in this article (i.e., how the Normal Curve works, Social Work’s reaction to the words “Normal Curve”) cited here, one can come closer to getting why this blog may be necessary.

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Using the Normal Curve to Enhance your Social Work Practice

Posted by nepeht on August 4, 2008

     The purpose of this blog is to help Social Work students, practitioners and researchers become more expert and comfortable at using the standardization and the Normal Curve to enhance their social work practice, education and research.

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